Interview with Author Diane Lapis: Hot on the Trail of Cocktails Across America

by Julie Chibbaro

pexels-photo-338627

We recently hosted author Diane Lapis who, with her writing partner Anne Peck-Davis, just published an unusual book that offers a unique overview of midcentury cocktail culture, featuring both recipes, and reproductions of the postcards used to advertise popular lounges and bars of the 1930s, 40s, and 50s. But it’s more than a mere compendium of recipes and pictures. In Cocktails Across America, Lapis and Peck-Davis tease out the stories behind each postcard, revealing some mighty strange history in these United States. I cornered Diane to ask a few questions about how she wrote the book, working with a co-author, and her unusual (yet serendipitous!) path to finding not only a great publisher, but a great agent too.

GLB: At Get Lit Beacon, you read to us a story about an Atomic cocktail. Is that really true? Can you tell us how you dug that story up?

Diane: The stories in Cocktails Across America use postcards as a starting point. My coauthor Anne Peck-Davis and I used a variety of materials to learn about the origins of the cocktail, or the bar or city in which the drink was first introduced. Vintage cocktail books and menus, newspaper and journal articles and advertisements, books, and websites were our go-to resources. For certain stories, we contacted historical societies, postcard clubs, and specialty libraries.

61R71oxI14L._SX387_BO1,204,203,200_

Two postcards depicting views of atomic blasts were featured in the Atomic Cocktail story: Benny Binion’s Horseshoe Club, and Vegas Vic’s Pioneer Club. I gathered information from the Nevada National Security Site, the Nevada Historical Society Quarterly Magazine, the Los Angeles Times, and various websites and books about popular culture in Nevada. Then I pieced together how the hospitality industry capitalized on the atomic blasts as a form of entertainment. Finding old photos of beauty queens sporting the atomic bomb style hairdo, convinced me that this story had to be told.

GLB: You also mentioned you decided to find an agent for the book once you’d written it, even though you’d already found a publisher. Can you say why you made that decision?

Diane: Anne and I were thrilled that Countryman Press (a division of W.W. Norton) was interested in our manuscript. Before signing the contract, I serendipitously met the CEO of the Curtis Brown Literary Agency. He took an interest in our project and suggested that we consider using his agency to help with the business side of publishing. I was reluctant, as we already had a publisher… what could we possibly need an agent for??? Everyone that we knew in the publishing industry highly recommended engaging the services of an agent. Anne and I then interviewed one of Curtis Brown’s agents and liked his attitude and personality. He was well versed in the field and patiently answered our long list of questions. We are so thankful that we signed with Curtis Brown! Our agent was helpful in negotiating the complicated contract and added value to it as well.

GLB: How did you work together with your writing partner? Can you share a story of when it didn’t work so well?

Diane: Working with a creative collaborator was a gratifying experience. Anne and I shared similar interests in postcards and 20th century cultural history. We readily agreed on content and the design of the book, thereby making it easy to achieve our goals. We were ready to jump into something new and bold, and delighted in stretching our horizons. We split the workload, edited each other’s writing, suggested pathways to follow, and discovered and shared new resources.

However, our biggest challenge was finding time to work together. We were free during opposite times of the day and live about a 45-minute drive from each other. Therefore, we had to carefully plan our meetings. We prepared agendas that kept us focused and ensured that we discussed specific and time-sensitive items. Sometimes we met at a bookstore or traveled to each other’s homes. We sent hundreds (possibly thousands) of emails and had many lengthy phone conversations. Scheduling telephone conferences with our editor and agent required additional planning. Anne and I both loved working on this project, so we found positive ways to deal with our time challenge.

 

Interview with Literary Agent Linda Pratt: Pros and Cons of Self-publishing

by Julie Chibbaro

LindaPratt

After hosting a number of traditionally published authors, we recently had a self-published writer as a guest at our Get Lit Beacon literary salon. Many writers in the audience were curious about the self-publishing process, and how it might affect their chances of eventually having their writing traditionally published.

I asked agent Linda Pratt to answer a few questions on her perspective regarding the benefits and setbacks of self-publishing, from her point of view as a 20-year veteran of the publishing business.

GLB: When does self-publishing work well for a writer?

Linda: Self-publishing has created a more democratic space to connect with potential readers similarly to how MySpace transformed the music industry in allowing musicians to offer content widely without being attached to a label. I draw the analogy because self-publishing has the potential to work well for authors whose models are comparable to bands. What I mean is bands play gigs to audiences who have come specifically to hear them. Their business model offers them a consistent means to connect with a target audience who are likely to purchase their recordings. Self-publishing can be the same for authors who have businesses that offer them this kind of consistent opportunity, i.e. life coaches, chefs who offer cooking classes, yoga instructors who run retreats, etc. It can also work for books about a specific place or event that may be seen as having too limited a market for a traditional publisher to acquire. For example, if an author wrote a book about some aspect of Beacon, and that author was able to connect with local newspapers and get enough shops on Main Street to carry the book, their goals for the book could potentially be met through self-publishing vs. not pursuing publication at all.

GLB: As an agent, what have you seen regarding self-published authors?

Linda: Most queries I receive from authors who’ve self-published start with “I wanted to see how the book would be received” or some version of that. For us in traditional publishing, this translates as it didn’t go as well as hoped so now the author is interested in the resources offered by a publisher, which is fair. But essentially the pitch to the publisher at this stage is a failed experiment, which all would agree isn’t the strongest sales tool. There is also a perception that the author may not be as open or committed to accepting editorial feedback and other publishing considerations.

That said, self-publishing can be a valid form of bringing books to readers. Just be clear about what only some of the costs include:
• the cost of an editor and/or a copyeditor
• the cost of a designer for cover and interior
• the cost to offer it on the platform of choice
• the cost of having an industry periodical review your book
• the cost of a publicist or publicity.

Ask yourself what your short term and long term goals are:
• Why are you publishing this work?
• Is this the one book you have in you, or is your goal to ultimately publish traditionally?
• How many copies do you realistically hope to sell?
• What are your financial expectations?
• How equipped are you to promote your work?

I suggest you research all aspects of both self-publishing and traditional publishing before leaping.

GLB: How has publishing changed over your time as an agent?

Summer2017headerimage-1Linda: I have been a literary agent for the past 20 years. The conglomeratization of publishing houses is probably the most significant change I’ve seen over that time period. While there are still individual imprints within many houses, there are only 5 major publishers at present, which equals to fewer competitors among publishers so fewer alternatives for authors. However, I’ve also seen a rise in smaller independent publishers.
The other major change has been the importance of an author’s sales track record. When I started in publishing, once an author connected with an editor at a house, it was pretty much understood that the author had found a home not only for that first work, but everything that would come thereafter. There was a loyalty on both sides. Now, an author’s sales track can make them ripe for poaching by other houses if they have very high sales, or on the opposite end, can make it necessary for authors to face the challenge of finding other houses.
Good luck to everyone on their literary journey!